World Newton expert will boost Newton Tree Party!

One of the world’s leading experts on Isaac Newton, Professor Rob Iliffe, will bring his unique knowledge to both the Gravity Fields Festival and its Newton Tree Party activity.

He will be joined by Sarah Dry, author of the forthcoming book on the 300-year history of Newton’s private writings titled ‘The Newton Papers: The Strange and True Odyssey of Isaac Newton’s Manuscripts’, (June 2014, Oxford University Press).

Their joint  contribution will add fascinating detail to ‘Walking with Newton: family trees and footpaths’

As professor of Intellectual History and History of Science at Sussex University, Prof Iliffe is co-director of The Newton Project  – a non-profit organisation dedicated to publishing in full an online edition of all of Sir Isaac Newton’s (1642–1727) writings.

The aim is to make it possible, for the first time in history, to grasp the full extent of Newton’s writing by gathering all his astonishingly diverse productions into a single, freely accessible electronic edition online at www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk

It includes a copy of a family tree drafted by Newton himself.  The diagram is within a letter sent by William Stukeley to Richard Mead, searchable under Willam Stukeley as author and then  ‘Memoir of Newton, sent to Richard Mead in four instalments with covering letters, dated 26 June to 22 July 1727’.

Or paste the following into a browser http://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/view/texts/normalized/THEM00158

And those joining the Newton walks can see for themselves what moved William Stukeley’s words to Richard Mead in 1727 (the year Newton died) on the very countryside that Newton would have known, loved and been inspired by.

“I have seen many parts of England & think none of a pleasanter view than about Colsterworth. & nothing can be imagind sweeter than the ride betweeen it & Grantham. this country consists much of open heath oregrown with the fragrant serpyllum much like the downs in Wiltshire; differing chiefly in this, that our soil lyes upon a white limestone good for building, that upon chalk. the valleys are gravelly, very delightful. woods plentiful, springs & rivulets of the purest water abound.”

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